Troy maxson tragic hero essay

It is true there is a point when Troy decides to build the fence for Rose in order to keep his family close to him. Correct, his heart changes, but these are acts of the common man. Everyone should care for their family and protect them with their entire being. This in no means makes Troy specially privileged or exalted. He is no higher than any other father who keeps their family close and provides for them with a loving heart. Even in the end, Troy does not feel the need to apologize for his mistakes. He expects Rose to forgive him and move on, leaving the heavy load of his cheating, the restraints he places on Cory, the expectations he has, everything, behind them. Troy dies with a tragic ending, but to call him a Hero would be a false representation of character. He is a faulty man, who believes to be right in his actions and expects everyone to understand and accept him. He is not a bad man, in fact he is a good man. But he is a broken man. He lives a tragic life indeed; if only he had been heroic.

Troy played in a Negro baseball league, he wanted to become a baseball player, but when the major leagues finally opened their doors to colored players, Troy was too old and out of his prime to be able to compete with the younger society. Troy's then made his life revolve around work and his family; he put his dreams of becoming a major league baseball player aside. He went into working and became a garbage man; he realized that he needed a steady income to provide for his family and to purchase the house that they live in. Even in the work place Troy wants to excel and make a stand for himself, talking to the commissioner about being a driver of one of the garbage trucks. Troy argued for blacks to drive the garbage trucks, but he doesn't know how to drive or even have a license. Troy acts out to try and better his black

Troy maxson tragic hero essay

troy maxson tragic hero essay

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